POLLUTION LOCATOR|Hazardous Air Pollutants

Hazardous air pollutants can cause many different adverse effects to human health, including cancer or birth defects. While over 200 of these toxic chemicals have been detected in ambient air, it has been difficult to gauge the extent of potential health risks because so few communities monitor for this kind of air pollution. Using government estimates of hazardous air pollutants in localities across the continental U.S., Scorecard characterizes their potential cancer and noncancer risks. Scorecard identifies the communities where cancer risks due to air pollution are the highest, and spotlights the toxic chemicals that pose the greatest risks.


Provide your zipcode to get a report for your community. Or use the Pollution Locator to search for reports on specific areas. To zoom in to your state's report, click on the map below.

United States
Number of People Living in Areas where the Estimated Cancer Risk from HAPs is Greater than 1 in 10,000

United States: Number of People Living in Areas where the Estimated Cancer Risk from HAPs is Greater than 1 in 10,000

Map Legend:
Number of People Living in Areas where the Estimated Cancer Risk from HAPs is Greater than 1 in 10,000
highest 20% of states
second highest 20% of states
middle 20% of states
second lowest 20% of states
lowest 20% of states

Hazardous Air Pollutant Reports Available at This Level

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    NOTE: Scorecard combines exposure data from the U.S. National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment with health effects information to estimate the health risks posed by chemical pollutants in ambient air. EPA exposure estimates, and the Scorecard risk estimates that are based on them, provide a screening-level assessment of hazardous air pollution problems and are subject to important caveats. EPA's exposure estimates are based on 1996 emissions data, although they are generally consistent with current air monitoring data. Scorecard's risk estimates are calculations based on models: they are useful for ranking purposes, but are not necessarily predictive of any actual individual's risk of getting cancer or other diseases.