POLLUTION LOCATOR|Basic Tools for Lead Poisoning Prevention Work



FIND OUT HOW MANY HOUSING UNITS ARE LIKELY TO HAVE LEAD HAZARDS
Scorecard gives you instant access to the total number and percentage of housing units at "high-risk" for lead hazards in any US community.
Provide a zipcode to get a county-level report. Numbers and percentages of older housing, low-income households and children in poverty are also available for states, counties and census tracts. This information can help advocates set priorities for prevention efforts and provide data for news stories about the problem. To view the report for your state, go to Scorecard's main Lead Hazards page and click on the US map or "Choose a State" and then click on "View Report." The data for indicators are presented on the label above each horizontal thermometer that compares this place with others. To view a report for any county in your state, select "counties" from below the state-wide thermometer, and then select a county from the list. For census tract data, select "rank census tracts" from below the county-wide thermometers, and then select a tract from the list. If you do not know the tract number but can identify it from a map, click on a map of this county. If you cannot identify the correct tract from a map but have an address, use the Census Tract Street Locator to obtain the number. Complete census tract numbers have eleven digits: two-digit state code, three-digit county code, four-digit census tract/block numbering area, two-digit suffix.

RANK YOUR STATE, COUNTY OR CENSUS TRACT FOR LEAD POISONING RISK
Scorecard ranks states, counties and census tracts (within your state or in the entire US) by total number of high risk units or percentage of units at high-risk. This could be useful for HUD lead hazard control grant applicants who are trying to prioritize target communities. It also could help local advocates identify potential lead poisoning "hot spots" to target education and outreach efforts, educate policy makers about the extent and severity of the local lead poisoning problem and do media advocacy. You can obtain reports
ranking counties in the U.S. with the highest number of high-risk units, or ranking states or ranking census tracts. You can change the factor used to create the ranking (from number of high-risk units to percentage high-risk, children in poverty, low-income households, pre-1950 housing), and the geographical area (state, county) that sets the boundaries for rankings of smaller areas (county, census tract). To change ranking factors/areas, select different ranking crieria in the boxes at the top of the ranking pages.

DRAW MAPS
Scorecard maps county or census tract level data about housing risk factors. You can see these data in an adjacent bar graph. Map boundaries are adjustable and you can print maps. Maps can help government officials and advocacy groups target programs (screening, education, housing inspections, etc.) and generate information for grant applications. Maps illustrate the geographic patterns that lead poisoning follows. To view a map, open the report for any state, county, or census tract, scroll to "Map Locating Lead Hazards" and click on the place name listed. In the Map Viewer window, move the cursor over the map image to see data for the area in the bar graph, and right click your mouse to zoom in or out, or to obtain Scorecard reports for the area selected. One way to print out your map: open the desired map in the Map viewer window; switch to the non-Java version; type Ctrl+P; set properties in the print menu to landscape.

INFLUENCE PUBLIC POLICY
Scorecard allows you to send an email to the governor of your state about a timely lead poisoning policy issue. From any report, select "Action Tools" then "Send an email." Throughout the website, from the main menu-bar on the left side, Scorecard
Discussion Forums offer you a chance to join online discussion about specific pollution issues in your community.

LEARN HOW MANY CHILDREN ARE KNOWN TO BE HIGHLY LEAD-POISONED IN YOUR STATE
Scorecard tells you the number of children documented to have blood lead levels exceeding 10 ug/dL in 2001 for most states, and makes comparisons with other states. Policy makers can use this information to compare their state with others. To view from any state report, select "Blood Lead Levels in Children."

LOCATE THE HOT SPOTS FOR LEAD AIR QUALITY HAZARDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASES OF LEAD
Information is available on ambient air concentrations (based on Clean Air Act reports) and releases of lead and lead compounds (from Toxic Release Inventory reports). Data and comparisons are available for counties, nationally and within any state. To view this data from any report, select "Hot Spots of Lead Air Quality Hazards." Scorecard also provides detailed county reports on other toxic releases.

CONNECT WITH LEAD POISONING PREVENTION ADVOCACY GROUPS
Scorecard features state-by-state listings of non-profit groups interested in lead poisoning prevention that can be a resource for groups seeking to expand their advocacy network or recruit members for coalitions or collaborations, and for individuals looking for information and/or somewhere to volunteer. To check out the lists, select "Action Tools" from any report.